Referencing & Acknowledgement Guidelines

When you present a piece of work for any subject it is important that you say where you gathered your information. This is called acknowledging your sources. It is perfectly alright to use books, newspapers, encyclopaedias, videos, Internet, magazines, CD-ROMs and interviews etc. to find information for assignments and essays as long as you are careful to say where your information came from. You can even write down sentences from a text as long as you use quotation marks and it is for the purpose of providing evidence to back up a statement you have made. Quotations should never be the major part of your work. If you use the work of someone else and do not acknowledge it, this is called plagiarism and is considered to be cheating, it is not your work and you will find your mark will be downgraded as a result.

Footnotes

When you do quote directly from someone else, you need to make footnotes. To make a footnote you can put the name of the author, the year of publication and the page/s used in brackets after the quotation e.g. “Our modelling clearly shows that putting a tax on unhealthy foods and subsidising fruit and vegetables would end up making the population healthier in the long term.”  (Healey, J. 2012, p.27). You then need to make sure the source of the quotation is included in your bibliography. There are other ways of footnoting that you will come across in books, i.e. at the bottom of a page or at the end of a chapter in a book; these methods are used for longer pieces of work.

Bibliography

Once you have footnoted a quotation it is included in your bibliography along with any other sources at the very end of your work. This is called citing your references. You should divide your bibliography into the following sections.

  • Print Materials e.g. Books, Magazines, Newspapers and Encyclopaedias
  • Audio Visual e.g. Slides, Videos, Cassettes, CDs, Films, Posters and Maps
  • Computer Sources e.g. CD ROMs and Internet
  • Community Resources e.g. Interviews with people either in person or over the phone

Your bibliography should be in alphabetical order by the authors’ surname, or in the case of a source having no clear author; you use the title to decide the order.

 

Example Bibliographic Entries

Book

Author’s Surname, First Initial. Title which is always underlined. Place of publication, Publisher, Date of publication ( If there is more than one date use the latest date

mentioned.)

e.g.  Healey, J. Fast Food. Thirroul, NSW, Spinney Press, 2012

Article in news paper or magazine

Author’s Surname, First Initial (Where provided) “Title of article in inverted commas” Name of publication, Date, Page #.

e.g. Kingham, K. “Vegies for Life” Australian Good Food, October 2012,  p.136 – 137.

O’Connor, T. The Diabetes time bomb – Poor diets fuel the fire”  The Age, August 5th   2013, Pulse Insert, p.4

Article in encyclopaedia

“Name of article in inverted commas” in Name of Encyclopaedia underlined. Place of publication, Name of Publisher, Date of Publication. Volume Number, Page Number.

e.g. “Nutrition” in World Book Encyclopaedia. Chicago, Field Enterprises, 2013. Vol. 14

p. 624 – 631

Non-book materials (DVDs, films, CDs etc.)

Title of resource underlined (The type of media goes in brackets after the title.). Place of publication, Name of Publisher, Date of Publication.

e.g. Super-Size Me. (DVD) n.p, Fortissimo Films, 2004.

Internet

Author or group responsible. Name of article. < URL> Date of publication. If no date is given on a web site you should write in the date you visited the site. (accessed on 23 May 2005)

e.g. Nutrition Australia. Disguising Vegetables. www.nutritionaustralia.org (accessed 5 August 2013)

CD ROMs

“Title of article in inverted commas” in Name of CD Rom underlined. Place of Publication, Name of Publisher, Date of Publication.

e.g. “Nutrition” in Anatomica. Milson Point, Random, 2000.

Community Sources

Author/Speaker. (last name first) Credentials/Position. (Type of information in brackets) Date of interview

e.g. Stanton, Rosemary. Melbourne University. Nutritionist  (The role of the GI of food in managing diabetes) 27th July, 2012

Please note that the materials/ sources given are not accurate but are to be used purely as an example.

 

Sample Bibliographies

Print Materials

Bickerstaff, L. Nutrition Sense – Counting calories, figuring out fats, and eating balanced meals. New York, Rosen, 2005.

Foster, H. GI Basics – The low glycemic way to lose weight and gain energy. London, Hamlyn, 2006

Hay, D. Fast, Fresh, Simple Sydney, HarperCollins, 2010

Healey, J. Fast Food. Thirroul, NSW, Spinney Press, 2012

Hofflin, C. Is it Gluten Free? North Geelong, Cats Kitchen, 2009

Kingham, K. “Vegies for Life” Australian Good Food, October 2012,  p.136 – 137.

“Nutrition” in World Book Encyclopaedia. Chicago, Field Enterprises, 2013. Vol. 14

p. 624 – 631

O’Connor, T. The Diabetes time bomb – Poor diets fuel the fire”  The Age, August 5th   2013, Pulse Insert. p.5

Sertori, T. Body Fuel for Healthy Bodies – Fruits, Vegetables and Legumes. South Yarra, Macmillan Education, 2008.

Thompson, H. Cookies or Carrots? You are what you eat. Broomall, Pennsylvania, Mason Crest, 2011.

Audio Visual

Super-Size Me. (DVD) n.p, Fortissimo Films, 2004.

A Healthy Diet (Poster) n.p, R.I.C.2010.

Computer Sources

“Nutrition” in Anatomica. Milson Point, Random, 2000

Nutrition Australia. Disguising Vegetables. www.nutritionaustralia.org (accessed 5 August 2013)

Community Sources

Stanton, Rosemary. Melbourne University. Nutritionist  (The role of the GI of food in managing diabetes) 27th July, 2012.

 

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